Cure for bed wetting

I’m looking for a cure for bed wetting for my 10 year old son, writes LB from Atlanta. I’ve read the reviews about how bedwetting alarms work but I’m wondering if these really cure the problem or are just a temporary fix? Why hasn’t my son’s doctor mentioned a bedwetting alarm to us?

A cure is defined as a means of correcting or relieving anything that is troublesome or detrimental. The “curative approach” to bedwetting is presently limited to bedwetting alarms. Research demonstrates that the success rate of using a bedwetting alarm approaches 80%. “Supportive approaches” help buy time until your son stops wetting on his own. Examples of these include: waterproof pants and bedding, waking him when you go to bed, restricting fluids, setting alarm clocks, motivational techniques and medication. Many families try these techniques during the years that it takes for their child to stop wetting on their own. Using a bedwetting alarm speeds up the development of dry nights, with the average child achieving dryness in 10-12 weeks. Once the behavior of getting up and going to the bathroom is achieved, the relapse rate is low.

Bedwetting alarms have been around for 30 or 40 years, but the technology has improved to the point that they are small, comfortable, safe and reasonably priced. Using a non-medicinal, behavioral approach to bedwetting should be a first-line recommendation. However, there is a lot of information to be covered in medical school and residency, and common childhood problems such as this get little attention. Health care providers learn through continuing education, as well as by listening to their patients and through their own personal experiences. Once your son gets to dryness after using a bedwetting alarm, let your doctor know about your experience. Over time, he or she may pass this information to other families with this problem.

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